TS-PHOTON 6'' f/5 Advanced Newtonian Telescope with Metal Tube
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TS-PHOTON 6'' f/5 Advanced Newtonian Telescope with Metal TubeTS-PHOTON 6'' f/5 Advanced Newtonian Telescope with Metal TubeTS-PHOTON 6'' f/5 Advanced Newtonian Telescope with Metal TubeTS-PHOTON 6'' f/5 Advanced Newtonian Telescope with Metal Tube

TS-PHOTON 6" f/5 Advanced Newtonian Telescope with Metal Tube

£259.00
  (1 Review)
✓ 2 year warranty

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5x in stock shipped 1-2 working days

About this product

Model:  ts_tpm6f5
Part Number:  TPM6F5

TS-PHOTON 150/750mm Advanced Newtonian for Astrophotography and Observation

This versatile Newtonian reflector telescope from the TS-PHOTON series captures a lot of light and provides extensive features which you will rarely find in this price range. 150 mm aperture reveals thousands of deep-sky objects with many details. Resolve star clusters into single stars or observe details of well-known nebulae. Thanks to the high-quality parabolic primary mirror the Newtonian also reveals many details on the moon´s surface and on planets. For visual observing, we suggest an optional 35mm 2" extension.

Astrophotography is also possible with this telescope. The generously-rated secondary mirror offers a very good illumination. Rather than corner-vignetting the telescope shows light and information. The high-quality 2" Crayford focuser (ball bearings) accepts all customary coma correctors. These features makes this telescope an ideal astrograph for astrophotography.

A wonderful entry-level telescope

Thanks to its simple operation and solid mechanics, this PHOTON Newtonian is also ideal for beginners. We recommend the Skywatcher mount EQ3 or EQ5 for this Newtonian. You can find both mounts in the accessories section. Right from the start, this telescope can be used to make wonderful observations of the moon, planets, but also nebulae and galaxies. Later this PHOTON Newtonian can be equipped with accessories such as coma correctors for astrophotography or even binocular approaches. The PHOTON Newtonian grows with your interests.

FEATURES

  • Aperture 150 mm / Focal length 750 mm / F-ratio F5
  • High-quality parabolic primary mirror with 94 % reflection coating for a brighter image.
  • Large secondary mirror with 63mm diameter for a well illuminated image field for astrophotography
  • Precise 2" Crayford focuser for accurate focusing - Motorfocus optional.
  • Adjustable primary- and secondary mirror holder made of metal, convenient collimation marking on primary mirror
  • Focus position optimised for observation with all customary eyepieces and for astrophotography with coma correctors
  • Due to its short build the Newtonian is suitable for smaller mounts (Skywatcher EQ3 upwards
  • Central mark on the primary mirror for easy collimation
  • Generous equipment: 6x30 finder scope, ring clamps, dovetail included
  • Weighs 5.9kg including tube rings and finder.
  • 690mm long with a 179mm diameter.

What's in the box

  • 150 mm f/5 Newtonian
  • Tube Rings
  • Vixen-Style Dovetail
  • 6x30 Optical Finder Scope
  • Dust Cap

Specifications

Aperture: 150 mm (6")
Focal length: 750 mm
F-ratio: f/5
Primary mirro: Parabolic primary mirror with 94 % reflection and Quartz protection coating
Secondary mirro: 63 mm - ideal for APS-C format sensors with suitable coma correctors
Field of view: roughly 38 mm illumination (90 %) - suitable for full format cameras and large 2" eyepieces
Focuser: 2" Crayford focuser with adapter to 1,25" and ring clamping
Backfokus: roughly 78 mm
Tube weight: 5,9 kg
Tube diameter: 179 mm
Tube length: 690 mm

Customer reviews

Average Rating (1 Review):  
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Excellent quality scope
Thursday, 6 January 2022  | 

I got this OTA just before xmas to sit in mid-range FL space.

I have a 72ED, and now also an Altair 80ED for the 4-500 space, and I have the 9.25 with 6.3 reducer for around 1300. And of course higher FL without it.

I have a 200P newt, but it's big and a pain to setup and balance.

So.. after some discussion on the forum where I wanted to say away from newts, I ended up going for a smaller newt! for value for money it just seemed a no brainer.

https://www.firstlightoptics.com/ts-telescopes/ts-photon-6-f5-advanced-newtonian-telescope-with-metal-tube.html

After first light I was impressed, but it was in need of a coma corrector, so on advice from FLO I bought this

https://www.firstlightoptics.com/coma-correctors/baader-mark-iii-mpcc-coma-corrector-photographic.html

So about 400 quid all in.

I've used it quite a few nights now, so wanted to just give a quick review - not war and peace, but as FLO has only started selling them, I figured it might be useful to potential buyers.

It came in a solid box, and seemed to have good collimation out of box. I've as yet not re-collimated. It looks nice in 'zwo red' and black, going well with my other ZWO bits.

The focuser is a crayford job, which though according to FLO, is better quality that the rack and pinion Skywatcher equivalent, does need careful setting up to avoid slipage with my asi1600, and EFW on the end of it.

I use the ZWO EAF - this took a wee bit of creativity to mount as the screw holes are not suitable. So it is on with one bolt, and some tie wraps - but it does the job and focuses reliably all night long through my filters automatically.

If, like me you came from a 200P, it might surprise you just how much smaller and more manageable it is. It's no longer a burden to setup like the 200p, easy to balance, less couterweights, and I am getting 0.4" RMS guiding pretty constantly with my EQ6r-pro.

It has an open back for the mirror, so be aware of that for darks. As I have quite a lot of ground light pollution I cover that up with masking tape.

I've had no dew issues so far, though I have woken to find it covered in frost - but the mirrors have remained clear.

With the coma corrector it appears sharp edge to edge - a few pics below from the last few days.

All in all, I'd say it's a great scope at a great price. I'm a very happy punter - it's going to be getting a lot of use in the coming months.

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